Sunday, September 25, 2016

Small Pressure Cookers


This is one of the best investments I have ever made. For a single person it is essential. A two quart inside volume including lid, I cook about a quart of food. There are not many stainless steel pressure pots this size.
  • 1 cup of Lintels or Mung beans, with Millet?
  • 1.75 cups water
  • After cooking add some ground walnut? And Umiboshi vinegar or Tamari (salt)

I can cook enough Lintels with Millet for a good sized meal in less than 30 minutes with out spewing steam all over my house that is cold enough for heavy condensation. Just bring it up to pressure (for a few minutes with legumes), then turn off the heat and let it sit.

Corn Bread

http://www.hungrycravings.com/2012_01_01_archive.html

  • Masa Harina, maize flour (processed with lime to prevent pellagra)
  • Pastry flour? Less than 50%
  • Leavening 
  • Cumin, Garlic, dry onion flakes, celery seed, caraway, oregano, basil...
  • Chipotle pepper tomatoes?
  • Lime juice, Butter milk ?
  • Eggs for binders?
  • Cheese chunks??
Enough water to make a batter, bake 350°-400°(you should know by now), bake this on top of beans and tomatoes. Or bake the masa then cover with beans and tomatoes.

Sourdough Cornbread
  • Starter dough
  • Masa Harina
  • sage or other herbs
  • Milk for the bacteria to eat
  • something to help hold in the gases: eggs or gluten or cream-of-tartar?

This may need some time to developed the bacteria that raises the dough.



Monday, September 19, 2016

Yogurt sour cream cheese dip


  • Quart yogurt (plain, full fat) drained in #6 coffee filter in a large funnel over night.
  • Dried onion flakes and chives
  • Umiboshi vinegar or soy sauce (salt)
  • Lemon zest!
  • Basil? Cumin? Smoked chili powder? Celery seed?
  • Fennel? Dill? Caraway?
This is so much better than buying factory made dips with way too much salt and other crap in them. Make two quarts from three quarts plane yogurt.



Squash Pie (essential for fall festival feasts)

http://learningandyearning.com/2012/10/14/winter-squash-pie/
  • Winter squash: Butternut is the sweetest. Delicotta & Acorn are good.
    {sweet pie}
    • Apples (in place of sugar),
    • Ginger, Cinnamon or Maple flavor .
    • Cranberries and Pecans or Walnuts.
    • Coriander, only a pinch!
    {vegetable pie}
    • Caramelized onions (open pan steam fry with soy sauce, until translucent) .
    • Toasted Sesame seed ground or Tahini.
    • Lime juice and Soy sauce.
    • Celery seed, Rosemary and Thyme.
    • Leeks, Garlic, Olive oil, and Sage.
    • Cheese (Parmesan etc)?
    • Fried canned fish?
    Steam the squash, mash in bowl, mix with what ever you want. Very simple and easy!

    A Crust is harder:
    • Butter or vegan shortening
    • Bread crumbs, Quick oats, Matzo meal, or Graham crackers crushed.
    Press into a baking plate and pre-cook the crust a bit (10 minutes?)

    http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/savory-butternut-squash-pie-hazelnuts
Butternu

Delacotta



Zen and the art of Veggie Burgers

http://ohsheglows.com/2011/07/13/our-perfect-veggie-burger/
Umami is the flavor of protein.
  • Sea weed (Dulse is the best)
  • Soy sauce.
  • Mushrooms.
  • Umiboshi.
  • Caramelized Onion or Carrot
  • Sauerkraut. (topping)
  • Walnuts.
  • Beer! (a dark bitter brew)
  • Yeast flakes.

Fat is the mysterious sixth flavor/ texture
  • Olive oil and toasted Sesame oil.
  • Cheese aged; Cheddar, Parmesan, Gorgonzola, etc.
  • oily nuts like Walnuts.

Holding it together

Make it thick then add some moisture absorbent material. If it still too wet bake them, may not even need binder.

Augar-augar may work and they tell me that thick cooking liquid from garbanzo beans will help it stick together. A little Gluten would work the best, but there are so many people inexplicably afraid of it! Eggs always work well.

  • Bulgur wheat or Bread crumbs (to suck up juice from lintels or beets).
  • Quinoa, Millet, cooked then fried dry.
  • Beans (soft enough to mash) Garbanzo bean flour (easiest) Pinto or black beans, lintels, you could even use Tofu.
  • Beet? Shredded and steamed?
  • Garlic, Cumin, Cilantro, Basil, Tarragon?
  • Ground cashews or other nuts? (adds sweetness and oily chewy texture)
  • LIME juice or Vinegar? (tartness) Balsamic or White wine
  • Dried onion flakes or caramelized fresh onion?
  • Celery seed? Tomato paste?
  • Tamari or Umiboshi vinegar
  • Maple (flavor toasted Fenugreek seed)
  • Smoke~ (liquid or Chipotle powder)!
  • Dark Beer!
  • Spinach?
  • Mushrooms? (Chewy texture)
  • Hemp seeds? (good texture)
Mix to a sticky mess and fry or bake. High heat oil like Peanut oil? Baking parchment paper?


If must use canned beans, at least find a can that does not use epoxy and other chemicals for the inside coating.

Chocolate (every Sunday)


  • Dark cocoa powder or Freeze Dried Cacao Paste (dense with antioxidants)
  • Carob powder is good also and it has it's own sweetener.
  • organically grown Sunflower lecithin Powder (granules are difficult to melt) helps harden. lecithin comes from sludge left after crude oil goes through a ‘degumming’ process. It is a waste product containing solvents and pesticides and has a consistency ranging from a gummy fluid to a plastic solid. So do your research.
  • Coconut oil
  • Coconut shredded ?
  • Sweetener like Stevia or Maple syrup (not too much)
  • Umiboshi vinegar (salt and tartness)
  • Orange zest or lemon will do (zest cutter and organic fruit)
  • Vanilla? Rum flavor? Cinnamon? Ginger? Nutmeg?
  • Fine ground coffee beans??
  • Hazelnut, Pecan, Almond or Walnut butter (or ground) ??
  • Dried Cherries? Minced
  • Milk dry powder?



In a double boiler melt the oil and the lecithin together.
Then add the cocoa a little at a time and taste it, if you make a thick paste it may be too bitter.

A thin hot mix can be poured over popcorn!


http://www.themediterraneandish.com/homemade-chocolate-champagne-brandy/


Zen and the art of Mushroom pate'





If you need measurements, you are in trouble.
  • Mushrooms; steam then pulse in small food processor (see picture) or bake after mixing.
  • Dried Onion Flakes have a mild flavor compared to fresh onion, or Shallots minced [and saute'ed?] I think raw would be better.
  • Thyme or Sage!
  • Yogurt cream cheese (with full fat) drain through a #6 coffee filter in a large funnel over night. Dill seed ground or chopped chives, dried onion flakes!
  • olive oil
  • Lemon- Lime juice
  • Garlic I always press garlic raw.

Cook it all together or separate, I don't like to have to cook anything. I think ground walnuts would be good in this.




Almond tea biscuit/cookies


http://www.heatherfrew.com/single-post/2016/03/14/RECIPE-Almond-biscuits


Every thing I cook has got to be flexibly to what I have at the time.
  • Coarsely ground almonds optional (soaked for a couple days? See fermentation below) this maybe too heavy.
  • Almond flour
  • Pastry four, more than 20% makes it easier to digest, but also raises the carbohydrate levels.
  • and/or Egg white(?) to hold it together.
  • Maple flavor!!
  • Lemon juice or Zest!
  • Sweetener (I use Stevia)
  • Leavening? (like “ener-G”)
  • Water (just enough to make a batter.) almond milk?
What else could it need? Anise?? Tahini is good with this. Or cheese (salt)
Apricot or Apple tea!


Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Pesto is excellent for bread aslo

I never measure, it is a waste of time



PESTO ALLA GENOVESE


  • Basil mass quantities (fresh or dried)
  • ground toasted Sunflower seed / Walnuts raw
  • Olive oil
  • oat or Almond milk
  • 3-4 cloves of raw pressed raw Garlic
  • Umiboshi or Shoyu (salt)
  • Black Pepper fresh ground
  • nutritional Yeast
  • Linguine (any pasta works, but these are the classic)





Hummus



    • soft cooked chick peas (much easier: garbanzo flour)
    [save a little cooking water from the beans]

    • sesame Tahini (not as much as you think)
    • Toasted sesame oil
    • pressed RAW garlic
    • coriander (be careful)
    • Umiboshi plum vinegar (salt)
    • Smoked chipotely pepper (optional)







spice for Lentil dahl(not cooked in)

toasted ground Fenugreek seed
garlic (fresh raw pressed)
ginger powder
cumin
turmeric?
ground Fennel seed? (not cooked in)


Pesto without cheese:

Toasted Sunflower seeds Ground with tons of RAW garlic
yeast flakes
olive oil / toasted sesame oil
mass quantities of Basil
coriander? thyme? oregano?
salt/ Tamari/ Umiboshi vinegar?

Tapenade:
fresh ground peanut butter
spearmint
pressed raw garlic
Umaboshi plum vinegar (salt)
serve with butternut squash.



Search for Protein








Eating Animals for protein is not sustainable!
Most people of the world use meat as a flavor. Yet meat flavor does not come from the meat, this includes butter. It is mostly salt, fat and spices.
Even the government says it is better to eat less protein than they used to tell you. 50- 60 grams of protein is the average you should eat. So if you're working hard try eating 70 to 80 grams. ChooseMyPlate.gov
Cheese is meat! Use sparingly! Strong flavored hard cheese is best because it can be used just for flavor. I had a heart attack because I was eating too much cheese.
This is very hard to find a way to live with out eating dead meat. But it is better than trying to live an unsustainable life style in a world that is collapsing from over population.



It is the lack of protein that causes a craving for sugar. And with out adequate protein your muscles can wear out much faster. I ride a heavy cargo bicycle for transportation and have not been eating 50 to 60 grams of protein, it started catching up with me. I ate meat for a while, and the pains subsided.



3 oz of meat has about 22 grams of protein but takes so much more energy to produce than Tempeh.
  • Soybeans (Roasted) 39.6g protein per 100g weight. Seems to have the most protein.
  • Soybeans (Boiled) 16.6g @100g, but the roasted beans are not very indigestible; they take some strong teeth to chew.
  • White Beans (Cooked) 9.7g @ 100g is good (pork 'n beans).
  • Lentils (Cooked) 9g @ 100g with 1g protein per 12.9 calories is the easiest & best for home cooking.
  • Hummus 7.9g @ 100g most easy to ingest.
  • Peanuts (Roasted) 24.4g @ 100g is the best, but hey have almost the same amount of fat.
  • Soy Tempeh 18.5g @100g has the best all-round ingestability verses digestibility and the Protein to Calorie Ratio is better than most beans: 1g protein per 10.4 calories .
  • Seitan 75 g @ 100g this beats every thing, (if you can make it with out much sodium. Seitan isn’t a complete protein on its own—it needs to be cooked in a soy sauce-rich broth to add gluten’s missing amino acid (lysine). )
  • Textured Soy Protein 50 g protein @100g weight (not so ingestable)
Maybe I should try making tempeh with peanuts and grains for amino acid balancing.


https://food52.com/blog/8406-all-about-vegetarian-proteins

Fermented foods

temph

Fermentation activates the enzyme phytase which neutralizes phytate. These anti-nutrients cause reduced mineral absorption and reduced ability to properly digest foods. One of the most significant and beneficial actions an adherent to a plant-based diet can take to maximize nutrient intake would be to soak, sour or sprout all their food seeds – a traditional practice that renders the nutrients in these foods more bio-available.



After soaking and sprouting the point where you can see them just barely start to sprout, cook with a bit of Kombu seaweed can help remove any Oligosaccharides remaining.


The key to this “flatulence-free” method of bean preparation is to utilize maximally two actions. One is the leaching out of oligosaccharides into a warm, slightly basic soak water, and the other is to initiate the activity of endogenous oligosaccharide-reducing enzymes to digest the sugars inside the bean.


Soak in Soft water (low in minerals, especially calcium) which has been warmed to about 90°F to 130°F and kept warm for a few hours. The water is changed two or three times to allow for continuous diffusing of the sugars into the water. If the water were not changed, and equilibrium between beans and soak water reached, the sugar might start diffusing back into the beans.


Hominy Grits, is a food made from Maize that has been treated with an alkali fermentation process called nixtamalization. Eating too much Polenta can cause pellagra disease. Look for Whole grain grits.
And remember if your sour dough bread is not sour tasting it may not be fermented enough. But don't expect factory made bread to be fermented enough even if it is sour.
Injera, a pancake-like bread from made from fermented Teff flour, ancient form of wheat.
Both soy and wheat are very high in lectins, and soaking and fermenting does not remove them. Besides the lectins and phytic acid contained in most legumes, the harder beans such as kidney beans, navy beans and black beans contain oligosaccharides. Humans do not produce the enzyme necessary to break down these complex sugars.
Now there is a pandemic of food allergies that most people just cannot understand. Especially maize corn that needs to be fermented with alkali (nixtamalization).
Maize subjected to the nixtamalization process has several benefits over unprocessed grain for food preparation: it is more easily ground; its nutritional value is increased; flavor and aroma are improved; and mycotoxins are reduced.